AVIFAUNA DIVERSITY OF AMARKANTAK, MP (INDIA) |  UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

According to Hinduism, Amarkantak is a sacred site. It is the source of the Narmada River, and the locals revere it as “Maa Narmada.” Amarkantak’s tropical deciduous forest is the natural habitat of many species; there are ponds, agriculture areas, and grassland that are ideal for bird watching. From 7 February to 12 March 2021, it detected 85 species of birds belonging to 15 orders and 48 families in six different areas: Jamunadhadar, Kapilasangam, Sonmuda, Mai ki bagiya, Main mandir, and Chakrathirth. In this study, the morning and evening hours of each day were chosen for identification and observation in various locations such as dams, farm fields, grasslands, and forest areas. Jamunadhadar has the most diverse avian fauna diversity, with 60 species, followed by Chakratirth, which has 54 species, Sonmuda, which has 39 species, and Main Mandir, which has 11 species. Dams, agriculture fields, tiny ponds, and grasslands in Jamunadhaar provide a better home for several types of birds. The spotted creeper (Salpornis spilotus) has been spotted in Jamunadhader and Sonmuda. It was not found in the previous year’s Achanakmar-Amarkantak Biosphere Reserve survey. Another bird that was not seen in Amarkantak in earlier surveys was the red naped Ibis (Pseudibis papillosa), which was seen in Jamunadhader, Chakratirth, and Kapilasangam in this study.

Please see the link :- http://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/2534

A PRELIMINARY STUDY OF AVIFAUNA OF GULBARGA FORT, KALABURAGI, INDIA |  UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

The purpose of this research is to present a preliminary investigation of the avifauna in and around the Gulbarga fort area in Kalaburagi, Karnataka, India. The research region is 45 metres above mean sea level and lies between 76°.04′ and 77°.42 east longitude and 17°.12′ and 17°.46′ north latitude in the northern part of the state. Kalaburagi’s chosen study area contains a number of lentic water bodies that support a diverse range of avifauna. The research was carried out for a year, from March 2019 to March 2020. The study’s goal was to determine the composition, quantity, species richness, and distribution of avifauna in the chosen study area. Wetlands in the fort area provide home for a variety of avifaunal species, which are one of the most important markers of ecosystem health. We expected that by providing grounds for feeding, breeding, and nesting for many birds, the big pond (moat) surrounding the Gulbarga fort area would sustain a greater number, richness, and diversity of birds. The survey was conducted using the line and point transect technique. Weekly observations were taken as part of the field survey to determine avian faunal diversity. A total of 42 bird species were discovered, divided into 14 orders and 26 families. 16 species of birds were Omnivorous, 9 Carnivorous, 7 Insectivorous, 4 Piscivorous, 2 Frugivorous, 2 Granivorous, and 2 Herbivorous among the birds recorded in this study. However, due to the neglect of local residents living near the pond and urban conditions near the pond, the pond around the fort area is deteriorating. As a result, it is critical to implement suitable conservation measures to ensure its long-term survival and innovation.

Please see the link :- http://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/2613

STATUS AND DISTRIBUTION OF AQUATIC BIRDS ASSOCIATED TO WETLANDS OF UJANI RESERVOIR, MAHARASHTRA, INDIA | UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

The current study looks at the diversity and distribution of water birds in the wetlands of Solapur’s Ujani Reservoir. A total of fifteen separate study locations were chosen from the outskirts of the Ujani Water reservoir, and a two-year study was conducted. Throughout the study period, a checklist of water birds was created for each of the study sites. During the examination, 81 water birds from 59 genera, 11 orders, and 23 families were discovered. Scolopacidae was found to be the dominant family at all of the study sites. The classification was based on feeding guilds, abundance, IUCN status, microhabitats, and migratory status, among other factors. Nearly 36% of feeding guilds were carnivores, 25% were omnivores, 9% were insectivores, 6% were piscivores, and 5% were herbivores, according to feeding guilds. Some of the birds had a firm preference for a single microhabitat, while others favoured dual microhabitats. The remainder birds had various microhabitats. Five species were divers, 15 were swimmers, 19 were large waders, 27 were small waders, and 15 were areal foragers, according to the niche selection study. However, 26 species were resident, 19 were migratory, and 36 were resident migratory based on migratory status. According to the IUCN red list, 76 species are Least Concerned, 6 are Near Threatened, 2 are Vulnerable, and 1 is Endangered. Based on the findings of this study, it can be stated that bird distribution among diverse places has demonstrated significant variation. The variance could be attributed to food availability, human influence, and water availability.

Please see the link :- http://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/2250

STUDIES OF VALMIKI NATIONAL PARK, BIHAR WITH REFERENCE TO AVIFAUNA | UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

The tract is very rich in avifauna. More than 250 bird species have been reported from Valmiki National Park  (Valmiki Tiger Reserve). Almost all the bird species are likely to occur that are found in Dudhwa or the adjoining Sohagi Barwa Sanctuary in Uttar Pradesh [1]. The common birds are Peafowls, Partridges (Black and Gray), Quails, Pigeon, Mynas, Bulbul, Hornbill, Parrot, Woodpickers, Vultures, Eagles, Flycatchers, Sunbirds, among others. Nepal Kalij Pheasant locally known as Churcha is also found. In the night several owls, owlets and nightjars can be easily seen. Globally threatened species such as the Swamp Francolin (Francolinus gularis) and Sociable Lapwing (Vanellus gregarius) have been reported from the area [1]. The vulnerable Sarus Crane (Grus antigone) also occurs in small numbers [2]. There were records of White-rumped Gyps bengalensis and Slender-billed vultures. Historical records of Bengal Florican (Houbaropsis bengalensis) from the general area also exist. A large roost of migratory Amur Falcons (Falco amurensis) was also discovered just outside the Reserve. Details of important observations are presented. Conservation issues are also discussed briefly and recommendations are made for the protection of habitats and birds.

Please see the link :- https://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/1589

STUDIES OF VALMIKI NATIONAL PARK, BIHAR WITH REFERENCE TO AVIFAUNA |UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

The tract is very rich in avifauna. More than 250 bird species have been reported from Valmiki National Park  (Valmiki Tiger Reserve). Almost all the bird species are likely to occur that are found in Dudhwa or the adjoining Sohagi Barwa Sanctuary in Uttar Pradesh [1]. The common birds are Peafowls, Partridges (Black and Gray), Quails, Pigeon, Mynas, Bulbul, Hornbill, Parrot, Woodpickers, Vultures, Eagles, Flycatchers, Sunbirds, among others. Nepal Kalij Pheasant locally known as Churcha is also found. In the night several owls, owlets and nightjars can be easily seen. Globally threatened species such as the Swamp Francolin (Francolinus gularis) and Sociable Lapwing (Vanellus gregarius) have been reported from the area [1]. The vulnerable Sarus Crane (Grus antigone) also occurs in small numbers [2]. There were records of White-rumped Gyps bengalensis and Slender-billed vultures. Historical records of Bengal Florican (Houbaropsis bengalensis) from the general area also exist. A large roost of migratory Amur Falcons (Falco amurensis) was also discovered just outside the Reserve. Details of important observations are presented. Conservation issues are also discussed briefly and recommendations are made for the protection of habitats and birds.

Please read full article –https://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/ 

Create your website with WordPress.com
Get started