A STUDY ON THE MUD PUDDLING ACTIVITY OF BUTTERFLIES IN ALAGARKOVIL HILLS, MADURAI, TAMIL NADU, INDIA |  UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

Butterflies are one of nature’s most amazing species, with an intriguing activity known as puddling. The phrase puddling refers to the supplementation of minerals and salts from mud puddles, faeces, and carrion. The mud puddling activity of lepidopterans has a significant impact on the insects’ nutritional and reproductive health. The purpose of this study is to record the mud puddling activity of butterflies in Alagarkovil Hills, a reserve forest area with rich biodiversity and high anthropogenic activity, and to test soil samples for various minerals and salts to better understand the role of mud puddling in butterfly reproduction. From July 2017 to January 2018, six sites in the Alagarkovil hills were surveyed for butterflies using the transect approach on sunny days between 0800-1600 hrs, three times a week. During the study period, 111 species from six families were documented, with the Lycaenidae, Nymphalidae, and Pieridae families being the most likely to display mud puddling. Male butterflies were observed to participate in mud puddling in greater numbers than female butterflies, confirming prior findings. Among the six study sites, the one with the most puddles had the most mud puddling activity. The soil examination of the mud puddling sites revealed the presence of salts such as sodium and potassium, metal ions such as manganese, iron, and copper, and macro elements such as phosphorus, nitrogen, and carbon. The salt and potassium percentages were discovered to be increased, which were stated to be the main elements eaten during mud puddling. The puddling activity was shown to be aided by the soil’s alkaline pH. All of these abiotic elements have an impact on the nutritional and reproductive biology of butterflies, which may be tracked to determine the community state and diversity of butterflies in a given location. The preservation of mud puddling areas may aid in the restoration of the butterfly’s biodiversity index.

Please see the link :- http://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/2890

DIVERSITY OF BUTTERFLIES (LEPIDOPTERA) IN MAHATMA PHULE A. S. C. COLLEGE CAMPUS AND ADJACENT AREAS OF PANVEL, RAIGAD, MAHARASHTRA | Asian Journal of Advances in Research

The Panvel region of Raigad district is home to a diverse range of vegetation, an estuary, and rugged hills, providing a haven for living organisms like as butterflies. Several human-caused activities, particularly the continuing construction of the Navi Mumbai International Airport (NMIA), have damaged habitat in and around Panvel. Both vertebrates and invertebrates experience a reduction in biodiversity as habitat is lost. There isn’t even a tentative list of the region’s Lepidopteran species. As a result, the current study was carried out in order to compile a butterfly checklist for the area. Butterflies were monitored for a year (from June 2019 to May 2020) in various places of the Mahatma Phule College of Arts, Science, and Commerce (MPASC) campus and the surrounding Panvel areas. A total of 42 Lepidopteran species were discovered, divided into 32 genera and six families. Nymphalidae topped the list with 14 genera and 21 species, followed by Pieridae (7 genera, 9 species), Lycaenidae (7 genera, 7 species), Papilionidae (2 genera, 3 species), Hesperiidae (1 genus, 1 species), and Riodinidae (1 genus, 1 species). This research would offer data on the region’s butterfly biodiversity, which may be utilised as a starting point for future butterfly research.

Please see the link :- http://mbimph.com/index.php/AJOAIR/article/view/1595

SEASONAL DIVERSITY, STATUS AND CLIMATIC FACTORS AFFECTING BUTTERFLY (INSECTA: LEPIDOPTERA) FAUNA IN CHAUBATIA GARDEN, RANIKHET- ALMORA, WESTERN HIMALAYA, INDIA | UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

An appraisal of seasonal diversity, status and comparison of relationship between various abiotic factors and butterflies species was made in Chaubatia Garden, Ranikhet from July 2017 to June 2019. Line transect were used to survey the butterflies with scooped-net between 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM. A checklist was made comprising a total of 41 species of butterflies belonging to 5 families, 10 subfamilies and 33 genera, of which 16 species were recorded under Common category including 13 species Very Common, 7 species as Occasional and 5 species as Rare. During the course of present investigation it was observed that the family Nymphalidae represented by 21 species was found to be the most dominant family followed by Pieridae 11 species, Papilionidae 4 species, Lycaenidae 3 species and Hesperiidae with only 2 species, respectively. The diversity index of all the seasons showed moderate rank that indicates community equilibrium in the environments was still good. Temperature and relative humidity was found significantly correlated, while rainfall showed negative correlation with the species across all the different seasons of the year. Therefore, understanding of the factors that affect the diversity of butterflies and their abundance in the Chaubatia Garden Ranikhet is important for their conservation.

Please see the link :- https://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/2112

BUTTERFLIES DIVERSITY (LEPIDOPTERA: PAPILIONOIDEA) IN AGRO-ECOSYSTEMS OF TIRUCHIRAPPALLI DISTRICT OF TAMIL NADU, INDIA | UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

Target: The aim of this study is to investigate the diversity of butterflies and their relative abundance.

Location and period of the study: from October 2016 to November 2017, in different agro-ecosystems of Trichy.

Methodology: From October 2016 to November 2017, a preliminary survey was performed from 07.00 to 12.00 during the day. The walk through the transect was performed once a month. Using the insect collection net, the specimens were collected. At the Department of Zoology, Nehru Memorial College, Puthanampatti, Tamil Nadu, India, the collected species were photographed and deposited.

Results: A total of 80 species from various agricultural areas in Trichy have been reported. Relative abundance analysis found 64 species were classified as common and 16 species were classified as uncommon.

Conclusion: We also observed maximum species diversity and abundance from the results in the months of January to June and October to November and there was a steady decrease from March during the early summer and in May it reached its maximum.

Please see the link :- https://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/1606

BUTTERFLIES DIVERSITY (LEPIDOPTERA: PAPILIONOIDEA) IN AGRO-ECOSYSTEMS OF TIRUCHIRAPPALLI DISTRICT OF TAMIL NADU, INDIA | UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

Aim: The present study is aimed to examine the diversity and relative abundance of butterflies.

Place and Duration of Study:  In different agroecosystem of Trichy during the period of October 2016 to November 2017.

Methodology: A preliminary survey was carried out during the day from 07.00 to 12.00 from October 2016 to November 2017. The transect walk was done once in a month. The specimens were collected with the insect collection net. The collected species were photographed and deposited in Zoology Department, Nehru Memorial College, Puthanampatti, Tamil Nadu, India.

Results: A total of 80 species were recorded from different agricultural areas at Trichy. Analysis of relative abundance revealed 64 species were classed as common and 16 species as uncommon.

Conclusion: From the results we also observed maximum species diversity and abundance in the month of January to June and October to November and there was a gradual decrease during the early summer from the month of March and it reached maximum in the May.

Please see the link :-  https://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/1606

DIVERSITY OF BUTTERFLIES (LEPIDOPTERA) IN MAHATMA PHULE A. S. C. COLLEGE CAMPUS AND ADJACENT AREAS OF PANVEL, RAIGAD, MAHARASHTRA | Asian Journal of Advances in Research

Panvel region of Raigad district harbors a great range of vegetation, estuary and mountainous hills and thus offers habitation for living organisms including butterflies. Several anthropogenic activities including the ongoing construction of Navi Mumbai International Airport (NMIA) has destroyed habitat in and around Panvel region. Loss of habitat results in the decline of biodiversity of both vertebrates and invertebrates. There is not even a preliminary list of Lepidopteran species of this region. Therefore, the present study was conducted to prepare a checklist of butterflies in the region. Butterflies were observed for one year (from June 2019 to May 2020) in different localities of Mahatma Phule College of Arts, Science and Commerce (MPASC) campus and the adjacent areas in Panvel. A total of 42 species of Lepidopteran belonging to 32 genera and 6 families were recorded. Among the 6 families, Nymphalidae dominated the list with 14 genera and 21 species, Pieridae with 7 genera and 9 species, Lycaenidae with 7 genera and 7 species, Papilionidae with 2 genera and 3 species, Hesperiidae and Riodinidae with 1 genus and 1 species each. This study would provide information on the biodiversity of butterflies of the region that can be used as a baseline preliminary data for further butterfly studies.

Please see the link :- https://mbimph.com/index.php/AJOAIR/article/view/1595

BUTTERFLIES DIVERSITY (LEPIDOPTERA: PAPILIONOIDEA) IN AGRO-ECOSYSTEMS OF TIRUCHIRAPPALLI DISTRICT OF TAMIL NADU, INDIA |UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY,

Aim: The present study is aimed to examine the diversity and relative abundance of butterflies.

Place and Duration of Study:  In different agroecosystem of Trichy during the period of October 2016 to November 2017.

Methodology: A preliminary survey was carried out during the day from 07.00 to 12.00 from October 2016 to November 2017. The transect walk was done once in a month. The specimens were collected with the insect collection net. The collected species were photographed and deposited in Zoology Department, Nehru Memorial College, Puthanampatti, Tamil Nadu, India.

Results: A total of 80 species were recorded from different agricultural areas at Trichy. Analysis of relative abundance revealed 64 species were classed as common and 16 species as uncommon.

Conclusion: From the results we also observed maximum species diversity and abundance in the month of January to June and October to November and there was a gradual decrease during the early summer from the month of March and it reached maximum in the May.

Please read full article –https://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/ 

SPECIES DIVERSITY OF BUTTERFLIES IN MODERATELY DISTURBED FORESTS AND ALONG FOREST EDGES – A CASE STUDY OF KARJAT, DIST. AHMEDNAGAR, MAHARASHTRA, INDIA

Butterflies, belonging to the order Lepidoptera, are ecologically and economically important insects. This study was undertaken to assess the species diversity of butterflies in the moderately disturbed forests and along forest edges of Karjat, India. Bimonthly surveys were conducted by Modified Pollard Walk Method through walking transect during daytime. Forty five species were recorded as belonging to 33 genera in 5 families. The most dominant families were: Papilionidae (4 genera and 7 species), Pieridae (8 genera and 13 species), Nymphalidae (9 genera and 13 species), Lycaenidae (10 genera and 10 species) and Hesperiidae (2 genera and 2 species). It was observed that the diversity of species exists in the meadows, shrublands, moderately disturbed forests and along forest edges. It is concluded that the study area is a home to diverse species of butterflies and the same should be conserved by reducing human intervention that affects the flora and fauna of the area.

Please read full article : – www.mbimph.com

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