EFFECT OF SEASONS ON FORAGING BEHAVIOR OF WHITE CRESTED KALIJ PHEASANT (Lophura leucomelanos hemiltoni) IN EX- SITU CONDITION | Asian Journal of Advances in Research

This observational study was conducted from 2017 to 2019 at G.B. Pant’s High Altitude Zoo in Nainital, Uttarakhand, at an elevation of 2100 metres, to determine the pattern of feeding and foraging behaviour, as well as the impact of different seasons on all captive White crested Kalij Pheasant specimens. The differences in foraging behaviour between males, females, and newly hatched offspring were also demonstrated in this study. All individuals’ foraging behaviour was also assessed during pre-breeding, breeding (courtship and mating), and post-breeding (including parental care). This research on the foraging behaviour of White crested Kalij Pheasants in Ex-SITU conditions is quite unique and useful in determining the need for feed additives as well as the survival rate of these birds. This research work aids in the enhancement of survival rates and the reintroduction of the pheasant species in its natural surroundings or in In- SITU conservation circumstances by having fundamental knowledge about the individual’s habit, habitat, and influence of various environmental variables.

Please see the link :- http://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/1771

A HABITAT ASSOCIATIONS OF ANT SPECIES (SUBFAMILY: MYRMICINAE) IN A HETEROGENEOUS LANDSCAPE OF KALABURAGI DISTRICT, KARNATAKA| UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY



The current study examines the differences in ant communities, particularly among the myrmicinae family, in human, vegetative, dry land, and teak plantation habitats. In both human and vegetative ecosystems, the species richness is the same, but the abundance is higher in the vegetative habitat. The Simpson index (1-D) for human (social) and vegetative habitats was 0.6274 and 0.3706, respectively, both less than 1, indicating low myrmicinae diversity in these environments. However, the Shannon Wiener index (H) for both human and vegetative habitats was 1.398 and 0.8349, respectively, showing that humans have more species quartered than vegetative environments. Surprisingly, no ants belonging to the myrmicinae family were captured in the teak plantation, despite Solenopsis germinata being the sole species found in the dry land habitat. These preliminary findings define the effects of various land-use patterns and demonstrate ants’ sensitivity to changing landscapes and disturbance caused by various anthropogenic activities, which encourages conservation-oriented bio-monitoring to include species-level interactions within the habitat.


Please see the link :- http://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/1774

PREDICTING HABITAT SUITABILITY OF Pistacia atlantica DESF WITH MAXENT AND GIS IN THE NORTHWESTERN REGIONS OF ALGERIA | BIONATURE



Pistacia atlantica is a tree species found in Algeria that is listed as a protected species and is considered endangered. From the standpoint of conservation and restoration, predicting the possible geographic range of this species and mapping the most suitable habitat for their introduction are critical. Using Maxent modelling, 23 environmental variables and 296 places of presence were utilised to forecast the possible distribution of Pistacia atlantica in an area of 62 203 km2. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and the True Skill Statistics were used to evaluate the Maxent model (TSS). Excellent (AUC> 0.94, TSS = 0.78) was given to the model that was created. The findings of this study highlight the most suitable habitats for this species and serve as a good guide for conservation and management measures for this species in the study area.


Please see the link :- https://globalpresshub.com/index.php/BN/article/view/1196

ANTHROZOOLOGICAL APPROACH: MAN-ANIMAL CONFLICTS IN QUEPEM, GOA | UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

The lives of humans and animals have always been intertwined, and in recent years, the ways in which humans interact with and think about members of other species have become the subject of systematic research. Anthrozoology is a fascinating, rapidly expanding area of science that studies humans’ individual and collective relationships with animals, as well as their attitudes toward them. Anthrozoologists are multidisciplinary researchers who study a variety of topics including pet ownership, breeding, animal science, conservation, zoos, animal in sports, companion animals, and other related topics. The psychological and biological underpinnings of pet attachments, attitudes toward the use of animals, cross-cultural similarities, disparities in human-animal relationships, sex differences in contact with other species, and the role of animals in art, religion, mythology, sport, and literature are all subjects of anthropozoology. Anthrozoological research is primarily concerned with quantifying the beneficial effects of human-animal relationships on all parties and studying their interactions. The aim of this study is to learn more about the Goan society’s attitudes toward domestication, species preferences in domestication, safety concerns, and man-animal conflicts.

Please see the link :- https://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/2097

CONSERVATION AND TRADITIONAL MANAGEMENT OF SACRED GROVES IN THE DISTRICT OF NADIA, WEST BENGAL, INDIA | UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

Patches of socially protected forests or sacred groves (SGs) developed around local deities and/or ancestral spirits are very old, and were once common in most parts of West Bengal, including the Nadia district. The reasons for their declining numbers can be traced to a variety of factors, the majority of which are anthropogenic. They are part of the state’s rich biodiversity heritage and play a significant role in the religious and sociocultural lives of the people who live there. They perform the majority of ecological functions because they are self-ecosystems. Many endangered species have been discovered to be healthy in the SGs. The West Bengal district of Nadia is rich in SGs dedicated to preserving local beliefs. In total, 60 SGs were investigated in various parts of Nadia, West Bengal. People of all castes and creeds are working to preserve age-old beliefs in old plants, their everyday medicinal uses, and hence their conservation. They are also contributing to the survival of animals that depend on these old plant populations, resulting in the conservation of local biodiversity in such SGs. The general public, mainly from rural areas of the district, is assisting the state biodiversity conservation authority in conserving the heritage of these biodiversity sites throughout the district through financial and logistic assistance, thanks to their continued efforts and active participation of women. Conservation and wise management of SGs are part of the aspirations of the local people, who benefit from the sharing of resources from such areas.

Please see the link :- https://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/1952

DIVERSITY OF BUTTERFLIES (INSECTA: LEPIDOPTERA) IN AND AROUND SANDUR TALUK, BELLARY DISTRICT, KARNATAKA | UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

A study of butterfly diversity was conducted during Sep 2019- Feb 2020 using Line transect count method to assess the species diversity in Sandur taluk, Bellary district, Karnataka. Habitat destruction in terms of mining activity can be a potential threat to this area and is expected to be the reason for reduction in the abundance of butterfly species in the study area. The present study was undertaken to document the species diversity of butterflies and explore the existing diversity of butterflies. A Total 56 species of butterflies belonging to 05 families, namely, Nymphalidae, Papilionidae, Pieridae, Lyncaenidae and Hesperiidae were recorded. This is the first study on butterfly diversity in this area. Our aim is to explore and document butterfly fauna, which will be a useful platform for conservation of butterflies and quantitative study of diversity.

Please see the link :-  https://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/1685

BUTTERFLIES DIVERSITY (LEPIDOPTERA: PAPILIONOIDEA) IN AGRO-ECOSYSTEMS OF TIRUCHIRAPPALLI DISTRICT OF TAMIL NADU, INDIA | UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

Aim: The present study is aimed to examine the diversity and relative abundance of butterflies.

Place and Duration of Study:  In different agroecosystem of Trichy during the period of October 2016 to November 2017.

Methodology: A preliminary survey was carried out during the day from 07.00 to 12.00 from October 2016 to November 2017. The transect walk was done once in a month. The specimens were collected with the insect collection net. The collected species were photographed and deposited in Zoology Department, Nehru Memorial College, Puthanampatti, Tamil Nadu, India.

Results: A total of 80 species were recorded from different agricultural areas at Trichy. Analysis of relative abundance revealed 64 species were classed as common and 16 species as uncommon.

Conclusion: From the results we also observed maximum species diversity and abundance in the month of January to June and October to November and there was a gradual decrease during the early summer from the month of March and it reached maximum in the May.

Please see the link :-  https://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/1606

STUDIES OF VALMIKI NATIONAL PARK, BIHAR WITH REFERENCE TO AVIFAUNA | UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

The tract is very rich in avifauna. More than 250 bird species have been reported from Valmiki National Park  (Valmiki Tiger Reserve). Almost all the bird species are likely to occur that are found in Dudhwa or the adjoining Sohagi Barwa Sanctuary in Uttar Pradesh [1]. The common birds are Peafowls, Partridges (Black and Gray), Quails, Pigeon, Mynas, Bulbul, Hornbill, Parrot, Woodpickers, Vultures, Eagles, Flycatchers, Sunbirds, among others. Nepal Kalij Pheasant locally known as Churcha is also found. In the night several owls, owlets and nightjars can be easily seen. Globally threatened species such as the Swamp Francolin (Francolinus gularis) and Sociable Lapwing (Vanellus gregarius) have been reported from the area [1]. The vulnerable Sarus Crane (Grus antigone) also occurs in small numbers [2]. There were records of White-rumped Gyps bengalensis and Slender-billed vultures. Historical records of Bengal Florican (Houbaropsis bengalensis) from the general area also exist. A large roost of migratory Amur Falcons (Falco amurensis) was also discovered just outside the Reserve. Details of important observations are presented. Conservation issues are also discussed briefly and recommendations are made for the protection of habitats and birds.

Please see the link :- https://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/1589

BUTTERFLIES DIVERSITY (LEPIDOPTERA: PAPILIONOIDEA) IN AGRO-ECOSYSTEMS OF TIRUCHIRAPPALLI DISTRICT OF TAMIL NADU, INDIA |UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY,

Aim: The present study is aimed to examine the diversity and relative abundance of butterflies.

Place and Duration of Study:  In different agroecosystem of Trichy during the period of October 2016 to November 2017.

Methodology: A preliminary survey was carried out during the day from 07.00 to 12.00 from October 2016 to November 2017. The transect walk was done once in a month. The specimens were collected with the insect collection net. The collected species were photographed and deposited in Zoology Department, Nehru Memorial College, Puthanampatti, Tamil Nadu, India.

Results: A total of 80 species were recorded from different agricultural areas at Trichy. Analysis of relative abundance revealed 64 species were classed as common and 16 species as uncommon.

Conclusion: From the results we also observed maximum species diversity and abundance in the month of January to June and October to November and there was a gradual decrease during the early summer from the month of March and it reached maximum in the May.

Please read full article –https://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/ 

STUDIES OF VALMIKI NATIONAL PARK, BIHAR WITH REFERENCE TO AVIFAUNA |UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

The tract is very rich in avifauna. More than 250 bird species have been reported from Valmiki National Park  (Valmiki Tiger Reserve). Almost all the bird species are likely to occur that are found in Dudhwa or the adjoining Sohagi Barwa Sanctuary in Uttar Pradesh [1]. The common birds are Peafowls, Partridges (Black and Gray), Quails, Pigeon, Mynas, Bulbul, Hornbill, Parrot, Woodpickers, Vultures, Eagles, Flycatchers, Sunbirds, among others. Nepal Kalij Pheasant locally known as Churcha is also found. In the night several owls, owlets and nightjars can be easily seen. Globally threatened species such as the Swamp Francolin (Francolinus gularis) and Sociable Lapwing (Vanellus gregarius) have been reported from the area [1]. The vulnerable Sarus Crane (Grus antigone) also occurs in small numbers [2]. There were records of White-rumped Gyps bengalensis and Slender-billed vultures. Historical records of Bengal Florican (Houbaropsis bengalensis) from the general area also exist. A large roost of migratory Amur Falcons (Falco amurensis) was also discovered just outside the Reserve. Details of important observations are presented. Conservation issues are also discussed briefly and recommendations are made for the protection of habitats and birds.

Please read full article –https://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/ 

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