ICHTHYOFAUNAL DIVERSITY OF KINNERASANI RESERVOIR IN BHADRADRI KOTHAGUDEM DISTRICT OF TELANGANA, INDIA |  UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

In this study, the Ichthyofaunal diversity of the Kinnerasani reservoir in Telangana state was discovered. Sixty-one fish species were discovered, divided into eight orders, 19 families, and 40 genera. The order Cypriniformes dominated with 24 species, accounting for 39.34% of all species, followed by Perciformes with 14 (22.95%), Siluriformes with 13 (21.31%), Channiformes with 04 (6.55%), Beloniformes and Anguilliformes with 02 (3.27%), Osteoglossiformes and Cyprinodontiformes with 01 species each (1.64 percent ). Perciformes supplied 06 (31.57 percent) of the 19 families listed, while Siluriformes gave 05. (26.31 percent ). The current communication presents fish species baseline data as well as diversity indexes and conservation status.

Please see the link :- http://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/2575


A PRELIMINARY STUDY OF AVIFAUNA OF GULBARGA FORT, KALABURAGI, INDIA |  UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

The purpose of this research is to present a preliminary investigation of the avifauna in and around the Gulbarga fort area in Kalaburagi, Karnataka, India. The research region is 45 metres above mean sea level and lies between 76°.04′ and 77°.42 east longitude and 17°.12′ and 17°.46′ north latitude in the northern part of the state. Kalaburagi’s chosen study area contains a number of lentic water bodies that support a diverse range of avifauna. The research was carried out for a year, from March 2019 to March 2020. The study’s goal was to determine the composition, quantity, species richness, and distribution of avifauna in the chosen study area. Wetlands in the fort area provide home for a variety of avifaunal species, which are one of the most important markers of ecosystem health. We expected that by providing grounds for feeding, breeding, and nesting for many birds, the big pond (moat) surrounding the Gulbarga fort area would sustain a greater number, richness, and diversity of birds. The survey was conducted using the line and point transect technique. Weekly observations were taken as part of the field survey to determine avian faunal diversity. A total of 42 bird species were discovered, divided into 14 orders and 26 families. 16 species of birds were Omnivorous, 9 Carnivorous, 7 Insectivorous, 4 Piscivorous, 2 Frugivorous, 2 Granivorous, and 2 Herbivorous among the birds recorded in this study. However, due to the neglect of local residents living near the pond and urban conditions near the pond, the pond around the fort area is deteriorating. As a result, it is critical to implement suitable conservation measures to ensure its long-term survival and innovation.

Please see the link :- http://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/2613

FISH BIODIVERSITY OF HIVARA (KHADAKDEOLA) RESERVOIR, JALGAON, M.S.INDIA |  UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

The current project lasted from January 1st to September 30th, 2021. Fish samples were obtained from various locations in the Hivra Reservoir, including Khadakdeoa Kd., Sarola, Waghulkheda, and Chinchkheda in the Jalgaon District of the Hivara Dam in North Maharashtra. Fisheries have a significant influence in the country’s economy. Fish are valuable in terms of economics, food, nutrition, medicine, and aesthetics. Fish biodiversity is extensive all across the planet, so it’s vital to study it all at once. As a result, the current survey aims to investigate fish biodiversity at a micro level. During the survey at Hivara (Khadakdeola) Dam, 10 new fish species from six different families were discovered. This research will aid fishermen and scientists in learning more about the richness of fish present in the dam, as well as fish farmers in selecting the best types of fish species for culture in order to increase productivity.

Please see the link :- http://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/2606

ASSESSMENT OF PHYSICOCHEMICAL PARAMETERS AND WATER QUALITY (ROTIFERA DIVERSITY) OF BHIMA RIVER AT KATTI SANGHAVI BRIDGE (KARNATAKA, INDIA) |  UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

The primary goal of this study is to determine the physico-chemical characteristics and Rotifera variety of Bhima River water at Katti Sanghavi, as well as its suitability for proper use by village residents living near the river. This investigational analytical project aims to analyse the quality of water using physico-chemical and Rotifera diversity examination. The examination of physico-chemical characteristics is crucial in evaluating the species richness, density, diversity, and occurrence of various aquatic animals in an aquatic ecosystem. The deterioration of water quality is caused by the excessive use of fertilisers and pesticides on agricultural land, as well as the introduction of residential garbage from cities into river water bodies. As a result, it is critical to test the water quality at regular intervals. Consequently, water samples were collected from several predetermined sampling stations of the Bhima River at Katti Sanghavi Bridge during the investigative research period of every month from March 2019 to February 2020. Total 12 physico-chemical parameters were measured, including atmospheric temperature (26oC to 38oC), water temperature (23oC to 32oC), hydrogen ion concentration (7.2 to 8.3), total dissolved solids (193 mg/L to 488 mg/L), dissolved oxygen (4.3 mg/L to 8.9 mg/L), free carbon dioxide (0.7 mg/L to 2.1 mg/L), biological oxygen demand (3.0 mg/L to 7.8 mg/L), total alkalin During the research, a total of 17 Rotifera species were discovered. According to the findings of the current study, the Bhima River water at chosen areas is within legal limits and mildly eutrophicated.

Please see the link :- http://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/2601

PRELIMINARY DATA ON SPECIES DIVERSITY OF AMPHIBIANS AND REPTILES (EXCLUDING SNAKES) FROM PANVEL, NAVI MUMBAI, INDIA | Asian Journal of Advances in Research

The influence of over-exploitation of natural resources on amphibian and reptile diversity in Panvel, Navi Mumbai, was investigated in this study. The current project took a year to complete (from June 2019 to May 2020). The findings revealed that there are 26 species of amphibians and reptiles in total, divided into 16 genera and 12 families. A diverse range of amphibians was recorded, with eight species representing six genera and four families. Reptile species variety includes 18 species belonging to 10 taxa and 8 families. Seven species of turtles and tortoises were present, representing four genera and three families. Polypedates maculatus, Polypedates occidentalis, and Pseudophilautus amboli dominate the coastal habitat of the Panvel area, followed by Duttaphrynus melanostictus, Ghatophryne rubigina, Hoplobatrachus crassus, and Hoplobatrachus tigerinus. The research area’s high diversity of tree frogs and bullfrogs is linked to the study area’s rare landscapes with heavy foliage, sufficient habitat, and optimal rainfall. Overexploitation of natural resources in the Panvel region due to the continuing building of the Navi Mumbai International Airport (NMIA) is one of the major causes affecting amphibian and reptile diversity. A lack of understanding of frogs’ and reptiles’ ecological roles, as well as a fear of snake bite, contribute to amphibian and reptile mortality. It is suggested that the general population be educated about the importance of amphibians and reptiles, as well as the sustainable use of natural resources. Because no previous reports are available, the data supplied here can be used as a starting point.

Please see the link :- http://mbimph.com/index.php/AJOAIR/article/view/1575

MEIOFAUNAL DENSITY & DIVERSITY OF TWO FRESHWATER RESERVOIRS, AMBADI AND SHIVNA TAKALI FROM KANNAD TALUKA, AURANGABAD DISTRICT (M.S.) | UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

Meiofauna are the primary energy transfer agents between phytoplankton and end users such as finfish and shellfish. This study examines the meiofaunal community in two freshwater reservoirs in the Kannad Taluka of the Aurangabad district, namely Ambadi and Shivna Takali. 14 species of rotifers, 10 species of cladocerans, 06 species of copepods, and 04 species of Ostracods were among the 34 species of meiofauna discovered. Rotifers, copepods, cladocerans, and ostracods dominate the Ambadi and Shivna Takali reservoirs, according to the study. In the Ambadi reservoir, the average population density of meiofauna was highest during the monsoon season (83 org/liter) and lowest during the winter season (68.175 org/liter). The value was determined to be highest in the summer season (31.75 org/liter) and lowest in the winter season (22.5 org/liter) in the Shivna Takali reservoir. In comparison to Shivna Takali reservoir, the diversity and density of meiofaunal groups, as well as seasonal variation, show that nutrient levels were moderate. In Ambadi reservoir, relatively high concentrations of zooplankton were found- in the order Rotifera>Cladocera>Copepoda>Ostracoda.



Please see the link :- http://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/1766

STATUS AND DISTRIBUTION OF AQUATIC BIRDS ASSOCIATED TO WETLANDS OF UJANI RESERVOIR, MAHARASHTRA, INDIA | UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

The current study looks at the diversity and distribution of water birds in the wetlands of Solapur’s Ujani Reservoir. A total of fifteen separate study locations were chosen from the outskirts of the Ujani Water reservoir, and a two-year study was conducted. Throughout the study period, a checklist of water birds was created for each of the study sites. During the examination, 81 water birds from 59 genera, 11 orders, and 23 families were discovered. Scolopacidae was found to be the dominant family at all of the study sites. The classification was based on feeding guilds, abundance, IUCN status, microhabitats, and migratory status, among other factors. Nearly 36% of feeding guilds were carnivores, 25% were omnivores, 9% were insectivores, 6% were piscivores, and 5% were herbivores, according to feeding guilds. Some of the birds had a firm preference for a single microhabitat, while others favoured dual microhabitats. The remainder birds had various microhabitats. Five species were divers, 15 were swimmers, 19 were large waders, 27 were small waders, and 15 were areal foragers, according to the niche selection study. However, 26 species were resident, 19 were migratory, and 36 were resident migratory based on migratory status. According to the IUCN red list, 76 species are Least Concerned, 6 are Near Threatened, 2 are Vulnerable, and 1 is Endangered. Based on the findings of this study, it can be stated that bird distribution among diverse places has demonstrated significant variation. The variance could be attributed to food availability, human influence, and water availability.

Please see the link :- http://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/2250

COMPARATIVE STUDY OF FISH PRODUCTION IN RELATION TO PERIPHYTIC STRUCTURE IN FLOODPLAIN WETLAND ECOSYSTEMS | UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

Periphytic communities are an important part of the wetland ecosystem, and they are impacted by a variety of ecological parameters like as light, temperature, nutrients, and water space availability. Aquaculture based on periphyton has enormous potential for increasing fish production by around threefold. The current study was conducted for two years, from October 2018 to September 2020, in two floodplain wetlands with unique characteristics of both open (Amda beel) and closed (Suguna beel) systems. During the study, the periphytic community, soil and water quality, and beel fish production were estimated and measured at monthly intervals. Maintaining a healthy aquatic environment and producing sufficient fish food organisms in water bodies are two essential variables for increasing fish output. The periphytic population of the studied ecosystems is made up of a mixed population of diverse animals. The species diversity values clearly showed that both wetlands were suitable for sustaining a balanced population of periphytic fauna. The goal of this work is to analyse the state of fish production in relation to periphytic structure in different habitats where flowing and static circumstances were compared. The Suguna was more productive in terms of fish crop, with annual fish yields ranging from 1601.01 to 1688.58 kg ha-1yr-1. The big carp provided the most to production in this beel (54.17 – 87.53 percent ). During the investigation, the percent contribution of the miscellaneous category of fishes in Suguna ranged from 9.59 to 45.83. The Amda’s yearly average fish production ranged from 353.76 to 442.85 kg ha-1yr-1. Miscellaneous species were a considerable input to the fish captures (about 62 percent ). Carps were responsible for 6.64 – 68.95 percent of Amda’s fish production. The fish production in the open beel was found to be very low, despite the higher biomass of the periphytic community. This was primarily due to higher siltation rates, poor management, weed infestations and nutrient imbalances, and many other issues related to river connectivity, which resulted in natural fluctuations in the beel’s water level. The situations in these beels are complicated, and a delicate balance is required to ensure long-term fish production and associated livelihood while also adhering to social and environmental standards.

Please see the link :- http://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/2382

CHECKLIST OF MOTH FAUNA (LEPIDOPTERA: HETEROCERA) FROM PANVEL, NAVI MUMBAI, MAHARASHTRA, WEST COAST OF INDIA | UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

The goal of this research was to look at the moth species diversity in Panvel and contribute to the creation of ideas for future research into the influence of anthropogenic stress on moth variety. The research was carried out for a year, from May 2020 to April 2021. The study sites were chosen based on their strategic locations and habitat proximity to the current building of the Navi Mumbai International Airport as well as anthropogenic activity. Moths were surveyed during the day using systematic and opportunistic field trips, and at night with the use of light traps. Instead of collecting representative species, moths were photographed, and colour images were used for primary identification. There were 45 moth species identified, representing 41 genera, 25 subfamilies, 11 families, and 6 superfamilies. The Erebidae family has the majority of the species (19), followed by the Noctuidae and Sphingidae families (6 species each), and Geometridae (4). The Saturniidae, Uraniidae, and Crambidae families each have two species, while the other four families each have one species. Erebidae, Noctuidae, Sphingidae, and Geometridae species dominate the Panvel moth species diversity. To document the full moth fauna from Panvel, Navi Mumbai, long-term monitoring and a more comprehensive investigation are necessary. The region’s natural resources will be used and conserved in a sustainable manner, which will assist to increase the region’s overall biodiversity. This checklist will serve as a starting point for future research on the diversity of moths in this region.

Please see the link :- http://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/2216

DIVERSITY OF GROUSE LOCUSTS (ORTHOPTERA- TETRIGIDAE) FROM WETLAND ECOSYSTEM OF KOLHAPUR AND SANGLI DISTRICTS OF WESTERN MAHARASHTRA | UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

Grouse locusts (Pigmy locusts) are phytophagous insects that can be found in abundance in wetland environments during the post-monsoon season. They love to reside under the leaves of dry plants. Grouse locusts are an essential food source for migrating birds, wetland reptiles, amphibians, and other wetland animals, and they play an important part in the ecosystem. There are 11 species of grouse locust that have been identified and investigated in terms of taxonomy. There were eight of them, eight of which were common and three of which were uncommon. In terms of seasonal abundance, the species Scelimena harpago was present all year, whereas the remaining 10 species were only found during the wet and winter seasons. The most frequent species, Ergatettix tarsalis, is reported in large numbers, followed by Euparatettix personatus. Thoradonta purthi, Hedotettix gracilis, Hedotettix lineifera, Ergatetix dorsifer, and Ergatettix guntheri species have been found in moderate quantities, whilst Acantholobus cuneatus, Systolederus cinereus, and Tetrix bipunctata species have only been found in very small numbers.

Please see the link :- http://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/2128

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