STUDY ON THE CORRELATION BETWEEN NESTING SITE AVAILABILITY AND THE PREVALENCE OF HOUSE SPARROW IN MADURAI DISTRICT |  UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

House sparrows are the only wild birds that have a close relationship with people. Sparrows have successfully adapted to human presence by becoming accustomed to the food and nesting locations available. Earlier research has suggested that the sparrow population has been inconsistent in diverse habitats during the last decade. An in-depth investigation of the factors that influence the existence of house sparrows in a habitat is required to determine the cause of the fluctuation in sparrow numbers. Previous research has suggested that nesting locations have an important role in the distribution and diversity of house sparrows. In this respect, the current research attempts to determine the relationship between the availability of nesting sites and the occurrence of the house sparrow in the Madurai district of Tamilnadu. The survey was done in 205 randomly selected sites in all 13 blocks of Madurai District using the line transect method over a three-month period, from August 2020 to October 2020. The presence of house sparrows was confirmed in 170 of the 205 sites visited. The potential nesting sites were photographed and recorded digitally. The highest population density of house sparrows was found in Madurai west (703) and Melur (658), while the lowest population density was found in Madurai district’s Kottampatti (150) and Vadipatti (147) blocks. Eaves of buildings, ventilation holes, unused holes in buildings, disused pipes, thatched roofs, and climbers/veins on the walls of buildings are also typical nesting locations. The prevalence of house sparrows and the availability of various nesting locations had a favourable link (R = 0.9) according to the Pearson correlation coefficient. Building eaves and ventilation holes were discovered to be the most popular nesting spots. Pipes and climbers/veins were unusual nesting locations. To attain reproductive success, house sparrows demonstrate a high degree of adaptation and plasticity in their nesting behaviour.

Please see the link :- http://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/2618

A HABITAT ASSOCIATIONS OF ANT SPECIES (SUBFAMILY: MYRMICINAE) IN A HETEROGENEOUS LANDSCAPE OF KALABURAGI DISTRICT, KARNATAKA| UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY



The current study examines the differences in ant communities, particularly among the myrmicinae family, in human, vegetative, dry land, and teak plantation habitats. In both human and vegetative ecosystems, the species richness is the same, but the abundance is higher in the vegetative habitat. The Simpson index (1-D) for human (social) and vegetative habitats was 0.6274 and 0.3706, respectively, both less than 1, indicating low myrmicinae diversity in these environments. However, the Shannon Wiener index (H) for both human and vegetative habitats was 1.398 and 0.8349, respectively, showing that humans have more species quartered than vegetative environments. Surprisingly, no ants belonging to the myrmicinae family were captured in the teak plantation, despite Solenopsis germinata being the sole species found in the dry land habitat. These preliminary findings define the effects of various land-use patterns and demonstrate ants’ sensitivity to changing landscapes and disturbance caused by various anthropogenic activities, which encourages conservation-oriented bio-monitoring to include species-level interactions within the habitat.


Please see the link :- http://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/1774

DOCUMENTATION OF HERPETOFAUNAL DIVERSITY IN NAWALPARASI DISTRICT, NEPAL | UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

The study’s goals were to I establish a checklist of low- to mid-elevation amphibians and reptiles, and (ii) determine the abundance, distribution, and diversity of the herpetofauna in Nepal’s Nawalparasi district. From May 2016 to April 2019, samples were taken at six different locations in Nawalparasi, Nepal, including an agricultural field, a human habitat, a forest, a riparian area, and a wetland. Each habitat type had 20 cell quadrates sampled, for a total of 100 quadrates per site. Visual experience surveys, opportunistic surveys, and pitfall surveys were also conducted on a seasonal basis. A total of 44 species of herpetofauna were discovered, including 12 species of amphibians and 32 species of reptiles. Amphibian diversity is highest in agricultural fields (S=12) and lowest in the forest (S=4), while reptile diversity is highest in the forest (S=24) and lowest in the wetland (S=6). A greater number of amphibians were found in agricultural fields than in other environments. Amphibian Shannon diversity index (H) in agricultural fields was higher (2.07) than wetland (1.54) and reptile 2.68 and 1.45, respectively. Similarly, the Simpson index of amphibians was 0.83, 0.72, 0.78, 0.82, 0.75, while the Simpson index of reptiles in the same habitat was 0.88, 0.86, 0.87, 0.81, and 0.74. In amphibians, the Pielou evenness index ranges from 0.33 to 0.52, while in reptiles, it ranges from 0.28 to 0.46. The results show that amphibians in agricultural fields are more diverse than those in the forest, and that agricultural fields are more diverse than wetlands in terms of reptile diversity. Information on the abundance and variety of herpetofauna aids in the management of insect pests, the detection of pollutants, the maintenance of healthy habitats, and future study.

Please see the link :- https://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/1838

PRELIMINARY SURVEY OF DROSOPHILA FAUNA IN AND AROUND BALLARI DISTRICT, KARNATAKA | UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

From October 2018 to March 2019, a Drosophila poll was conducted (winter to early summer). Drosophila was collected from 15 different Ballari locations. Fruit flies were collected using a bottle trapping method and a net sweeping method. Fruit flies were gathered and cultured in culture bottles with wheat cream agar medium. There were a total of 733 Drosophilas collected, with 260 males and 473 females. In the current study, a total of 08 species were discovered. The presence of D. melanogaster and D. ananassae in all fifteen areas suggests that they are dominant in Ballari (North-East Karnataka). The research finds that not only the number of Drosophila species varies by location, but also the number of individuals belonging to the same species varies by location. Consideration of the common and abundant species in the current study reveals that numerical variation exists for these species at all fifteen altitudes.

Please see the link :- https://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/1897

DIVERSITY OF BUTTERFLIES (INSECTA: LEPIDOPTERA) IN AND AROUND SANDUR TALUK, BELLARY DISTRICT, KARNATAKA | UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

During Sept 2019-Feb 2020, a butterfly diversity analysis was conducted using the method of line transect count to determine species diversity in Sandur taluk, Bellary district, Karnataka. In terms of mining activities, habitat loss can pose a possible threat to this region and is expected to be the reason for reducing the abundance of butterfly species in the study area. The present study was conducted to record the diversity of species of butterflies and to investigate the current diversity of butterflies. A A total of 56 butterfly species belonging to 05 families have been recorded, namely Nymphalidae, Papilionidae, Pieridae, Lyncaenidae and Hesperiidae. This is the first research in this field on butterfly diversity. Our goal is to explore and record the butterfly fauna, which will be a useful butterfly conservation forum and a quantitative diversity analysis.

Please see the link :- https://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/1685

AQUATIC INSECTS (ODONATA) DIVERSITY IN FLOATING AND EMERGENT MACROPHYTES IN SAHEED MATANGINI BLOCK (TAMLUK), WEST BENGAL (INDIA) | UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

Geographical zone-wise biodiversity study of different species is of paramount importance to monitor and conserve the species diversity in an ecosystem. The objective of present study was to make a diversity database of macrophyte associated aquatic insects in Purba Medinipur, West Bengal, India. The aquatic insects were collected from aquatic macrophytes, Ipomoea aquatica, Eichhornia crassipes and Nelumbo nucifera grown in 6 water bodies of Sahid Matangigi Block (Tamluk, 22.3°N 87.92°E), Purba Medinipur, West Bengal, India. The results revealed that occurrences of 6 aquatic insect orders (Coleoptera, Hemiptera, Odonata, Diptera, Ephemenoptera and Trichoptera) in Ipomoea aquatica with maximum abundance of 3 odonate families (Libellulidae, Coenagrionidae and Platycnemididae). The present biodiversity study of aquatic insects indicate that Odonata especially prefer floating macrophyte as a favourable habitat and therefore higher species diversity therein. Further study is needed considering other aquatic macrophytes in this concern to develop a valid species specific database essential for biodiversity conservation in the rapidly changing present environment.

Please see the link :-
https://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/1669

DIVERSITY OF BUTTERFLIES (INSECTA: LEPIDOPTERA) IN AND AROUND SANDUR TALUK, BELLARY DISTRICT, KARNATAKA | UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

A study of butterfly diversity was conducted during Sep 2019- Feb 2020 using Line transect count method to assess the species diversity in Sandur taluk, Bellary district, Karnataka. Habitat destruction in terms of mining activity can be a potential threat to this area and is expected to be the reason for reduction in the abundance of butterfly species in the study area. The present study was undertaken to document the species diversity of butterflies and explore the existing diversity of butterflies. A Total 56 species of butterflies belonging to 05 families, namely, Nymphalidae, Papilionidae, Pieridae, Lyncaenidae and Hesperiidae were recorded. This is the first study on butterfly diversity in this area. Our aim is to explore and document butterfly fauna, which will be a useful platform for conservation of butterflies and quantitative study of diversity.

Please see the link :-  https://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/1685

AQUATIC INSECTS (ODONATA) DIVERSITY IN FLOATING AND EMERGENT MACROPHYTES IN SAHEED MATANGINI BLOCK (TAMLUK), WEST BENGAL (INDIA) | UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

Geographical zone-wise biodiversity study of different species is of paramount importance to monitor and conserve the species diversity in an ecosystem. The objective of present study was to make a diversity database of macrophyte associated aquatic insects in Purba Medinipur, West Bengal, India. The aquatic insects were collected from aquatic macrophytes, Ipomoea aquatica, Eichhornia crassipes and Nelumbo nucifera grown in 6 water bodies of Sahid Matangigi Block (Tamluk, 22.3°N 87.92°E), Purba Medinipur, West Bengal, India. The results revealed that occurrences of 6 aquatic insect orders (Coleoptera, Hemiptera, Odonata, Diptera, Ephemenoptera and Trichoptera) in Ipomoea aquatica with maximum abundance of 3 odonate families (Libellulidae, Coenagrionidae and Platycnemididae). The present biodiversity study of aquatic insects indicate that Odonata especially prefer floating macrophyte as a favourable habitat and therefore higher species diversity therein. Further study is needed considering other aquatic macrophytes in this concern to develop a valid species specific database essential for biodiversity conservation in the rapidly changing present environment.

Please see the link :-  https://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/1669

EFFECT OF Prosopis juliflora ON AVIFAUNA IN UDAIPUR DISTRICT, RAJASTHAN, INDIA | UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

Prosopis juliflora plant species is an exotic species that is widely spreads in India. Present study (August, 2017 to February, 2020 in Udaipur district, Rajasthan) indicates that abundance of Prosopis juliflora and native floral species were correlated with the bird’s species diversity, richness and abundance. Study divided into four categories on the basis abundance of Prosopis juliflora- very low abundance of Prosopis juliflora (VALPJ), low abundance of Prosopis juliflora (LAPJ), medium abundance of Prosopis juliflora(MAPJ) and high abundance of Prosopis juliflora (HAPJ). Distribution of bird’s species in different area can be directly related to the density of native vegetation and P. juliflora composition. Highest bird diversity and abundance was observed in VLAPJ followed by LAPJ, MAPJ and lowest observed in HAPJ. P. juliflora leads to change in habitat and affect availability of food and nesting sites due to alleo-chemical substance releasing in soils, they inhibit growth of other native plant. Simpson diversity (0.9699) and Shannon diversity (3.872) were maximum observed in VALPJ area and minimum Simpson diversity (0.9556) and Shannon diversity (3.34) observed in HAPJ area. Birds abundance of VALPJ area was (Brillouin = 3.834, Fisher_ alpha= 15.85) maximum and minimum birds abundance was recorded in HAPJ area (Brillouin= 3.227, Fisher_ alpha= 7.541). Highest species richness was observed in VLAPJ (Menhinick= 1.193, Margalef’s= 10.74, Chao-1=95.6) and lowest richness was recorded in HAPJ (Menhinick=1.029, Margalef’s= 5.328, Chao-1=40). Common species like babbler, house sparrow, dove were generally observed in HAPJ area, but environmental sensitive species vultures, kites, eagles and owls were completely absent in high abundance of HAPJ area. Present study shows high abundance of P. juliflora (HAPJ) negatively affects bird’s diversity, abundance and richness. While native vegetations provide better habitat and suitable habitat for birds.

Please see the link :- https://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/1596

STUDIES OF VALMIKI NATIONAL PARK, BIHAR WITH REFERENCE TO AVIFAUNA | UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

The tract is very rich in avifauna. More than 250 bird species have been reported from Valmiki National Park  (Valmiki Tiger Reserve). Almost all the bird species are likely to occur that are found in Dudhwa or the adjoining Sohagi Barwa Sanctuary in Uttar Pradesh [1]. The common birds are Peafowls, Partridges (Black and Gray), Quails, Pigeon, Mynas, Bulbul, Hornbill, Parrot, Woodpickers, Vultures, Eagles, Flycatchers, Sunbirds, among others. Nepal Kalij Pheasant locally known as Churcha is also found. In the night several owls, owlets and nightjars can be easily seen. Globally threatened species such as the Swamp Francolin (Francolinus gularis) and Sociable Lapwing (Vanellus gregarius) have been reported from the area [1]. The vulnerable Sarus Crane (Grus antigone) also occurs in small numbers [2]. There were records of White-rumped Gyps bengalensis and Slender-billed vultures. Historical records of Bengal Florican (Houbaropsis bengalensis) from the general area also exist. A large roost of migratory Amur Falcons (Falco amurensis) was also discovered just outside the Reserve. Details of important observations are presented. Conservation issues are also discussed briefly and recommendations are made for the protection of habitats and birds.

Please see the link :- https://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/1589

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