TEMPLE WASTE UTILIZATION, ITS MANAGEMENT AND FUTURE PERSPECTIVES TO ATTAIN SUSTAINABLE MANAGEMENT |  UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

The greatest problem ailing the cosmos and wreaking havoc on the ecosystem is the management of “solid waste.” Waste generation is increasing as a result of anthropogenic activities, which are creating massive environmental damage and global warming. Solid trash, such as food waste, home waste, plastic waste, and temple debris, contains a high concentration of contaminants such as carbon. A large budget is being spent around the world to minimise and manage garbage by using landfill or incinerator processes. One of the biggest problems is temple garbage, which consists of flowers, leaves, coconuts, grains, and fruits, among other things, the majority of which are biodegradable. Because these elements are of a highly organic nature, temple waste can also serve as a medium for the growth of microbes. The florets can be used to make a variety of valuable and useful items, as well as in enterprises that make fragrances, soaps, cosmetics, food, and so on. However, temple garbage is frequently dumped into running water or local bodies of water, resulting in water poisoning and the death of aquatic species. This review describes the hazards (environmental, human health, aquatic) caused by temple waste through various mechanisms, such as contamination of water bodies and the propagation of microbes, pests, rodents, and so on, as well as waste utilisation for conversion into useful products such as manure, incense sticks, biochar, biofuel, pigments, papers, and dyes. All of these goods have broad applications in various industries, reinforcing principles such as “best out of waste” and “from the temple to the temple.” This review sets the way for environmental conservation, pollution reduction, and the resolution of the energy dilemma.

Please see the link :- http://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/2587


THE ROLE OF BUTTERFLIES TOWARDS CREATING ECOLOGICAL BALANCE AND BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION IN SOUTHERN PART OF WESTERN GHATS (PALANI HILLS) | UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY


Four tropical habitats with varying levels of disturbance in the community of butterfly species were monitored in the Southern Part of the Western Ghats (Tamilnadu) for diversity and seasonal patterns. In the late monsoon and early winter, species richness was at its peak. During these seasons, the majority of butterfly species had abundance peaks. Pollution and climatic conditions influenced species composition in the impacted areas and shortened the flight durations of some species, but they had no effect on species richness. Biodiversity loss has a significant impact on species composition, favouring Lycaenids and Nymphalids with herb-eating caterpillars. When phenophases of the larval feeding plant and the population trend of a little Lycaenid were documented at one of the sites, the population showed a significant increase during the time when the plants were in an appropriate phenophase for caterpillar growth. It is suggested that herb-feeding and non-herb-feeding Lycaenids may have interacted evolutionarily.


Please see the link :- http://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/1796


WATER QUALITY ANALYSIS OF ANASAGAR LAKE, AJMER, RAJASTHAN | Asian Journal of Advances in Medical Science

On the basis of weekly sampling, the water quality of Anasagar Lake was examined for four months. This study is the first to offer data on lake water quality. Temperature (24.50°C to 33.90°C), pH (7.9 to 8.2), electrical conductivity (2.07 to 2.49 mS/cm), dissolved oxygen (7.53 to 8.73 mgL-1), alkalinity (101 to 109 mgL-1), Hardness (121 to 150 mgL-1), total dissolved solid (1344.00 to 1617.00 mgL-1), nitrate (0.88 mgL-1 to 1.02 mgL-1), phosphate (0. Anthropogenic stressors such as sewage disposal, municipal wastewater, detergent input from washing clothes and bathing, pesticide and chemical fertiliser input from unsustainable agriculture, aquaculture, and horticulture, and urban settlement have caused the lake to become severely polluted and hypertrophic.

Please see the link :- http://mbimph.com/index.php/AJOAIR/article/view/2476

A REVIEW ON SOME HEAVY METALS TOXICITY ON HAEMATOLOGICAL PARAMETERS IN FRESH WATER FISHES | UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

Contamination of the aquatic ecology by heavy metals could be a major issue. Agricultural, industrial, and mining activities all produce dangerous quantities of heavy metals. This could lead to contamination and alterations in the aquatic environment’s physicochemical features. This contamination is extremely hazardous to fish, fish products, the fish ecosystem, and human health. The goal of this study was to detect pollution levels and fish health, as well as to investigate the effects of heavy metals such as Pb, Hg, Fe, Cr, Cu, and Zn on RBC, WBC, Hb, PCV, MCH, MCV, and MCHC on various blood parameters such as RBC, WBC, Hb, PCV, MCH, MCV, and MCHC. According to the findings, heavy metal poisoning of aquatic systems from natural anthropogenic sources has become a global concern that poses a threat to ecosystems and natural communities. As a result, this research examines the effects of heavy metals on freshwater fish. Heavy metals (such as cadmium, zinc, lead, and copper) are bioaccumulated in fish through numerous organs such as the gills, liver, stomach, and intestine. The effects of certain heavy metals are highlighted and contrasted to the allowable limit set by the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) in 1983. For all of the aforementioned reasons, the goal of this review was to look into the role of heavy metals in the environment, toxic mechanisms, and toxic consequences on fish.

Please see the link :- http://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/2134

THE IMPACT POLLUTION WITH MATERIAL PARTICLES ON VEGETABLE COMPONENTS | UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

The effect of contamination with material particles PM 10, PM 2.5 on vegetation is investigated in this paper. Reduced photosynthesis light, increased leaf temperature due to changes in surface optical properties, impaired respiration, impaired stomatal activity, reduced leaf area in the immediate vicinity of contaminants, reduced concentrations of photosynthetic pigments, chlorophyll, and directly plant productivity are all consequences of vegetation particles. Changes in soil chemistry, composition, or foliar chemistry result in pollution caused by road traffic on vegetation. Due to the rapid dispersion of air pollutants from automobiles, the effect on vegetation occurs 1 km from the lane. Pollutants are captured by the leaves of plants, and air pollution has a direct impact on their assimilative organs. The material particles PM 10 (is a mixture of very small particles with a diameter of 10 micrometres or less), temperature, relative humidity, and wind speed were monitored with the weather station from the Polytechnic University of Bucharest, Fa. The absorption of material particles by the leaves of plants resulted in a decline in material particles in the presence of vegetation. The amount of particulate contamination is influenced by weather conditions; for example, when the temperature is high, the sky is dark, and there is little wind, PM 10 and PM 2.5 concentrations are higher. Optical and electron microscopy were used to demonstrate the structural aspects of the PM10 and PM 2.5 material particles.

Please see the link :- https://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/2011

GEOELECTRIC DELINEATION OF SUBSURFACE LEACHATE CONTAMINANT CONTROLLED CONDUCTIVE GROUNDWATER IN LAGOS STATE | Asian Journal of Advances in Research

The amount of water percolating through the refuse dumpsite in Igando, Lagos state, determines the volume of leachate generated, and this has posed a threat to groundwater obtained at various locations in the city. Due to the percolation of contaminant leachate released by the landfill into the groundwater aquifer, an ineffective waste disposal system has resulted in health hazards such as periodic epidemics and communicable diseases. In mapping areas of polluted soil and groundwater quality, 2D electrical resistivity imaging and vertical electrical sounding (VES) can be useful. The 2D resistivity structures and sounding interpretation showed three subsurface layers: topsoil, sand clay (brackish water), and sandstone (good quality fresh water). The shallow occurrence, as well as the thin porous overburden units overlying the layers, the sandstone areas, and the resistivity structures, were found to be the study area’s main aquifer units. The mapped area that contained sand layers was also discovered to be a water-bearing formation that had been contaminated, rendering the groundwater around the landfill conductive. The findings have showed that landfill leachate has a low effect on groundwater, which can be due to the current clay subsoil at the dumpsite, which is thought to have a major impact on natural water percolation of Leachate into the groundwater.

Please see the link :- https://mbimph.com/index.php/AJOAIR/article/view/1886

DETERMINATION OF SOME COMMONLY USED ANTIBIOTIC RESIDUES IN HOSPITAL EFFLUENTS OF KASHMIR VALLEY | UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

Large quantities of antibiotics are being used in hospitals for the treatment of human diseases and they are the primary sites of administering antibiotics into the environment. The study aimed to survey a total of five commonly used antibiotics based on SPE- LC-MS-MS technology for the out coming effluent at four hospitals of Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir, India. Samples were taken from the main sewers of the hospital where the effluent meets the natural environment. A total of 12 samples (3 from each hospital) and were mixed together to form only 4 composite samples for identifying the presence of antibiotic residues and the samples were named as SKIMS, SMHS, LD AND JLNM. Due to continuous release of the antibiotics from hospitals into the environment, the main aim of the study was to determine the presence of antibiotics in the hospital effluent by using solid-phase extraction (SPE) and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) technique. The results indicated that 95% of the samples contained residues of at least one of the investigated antibiotics. The results showed that amikacin was found in all the four samples, whereas, levofloxacin, ceftriaxone and azithromycin were observed in three, two and two samples, respectively. Pollution of water bodies by antibiotic utilization in hospitals has deleterious consequences on human health and environment.

Please see the link :- https://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/1703

DETERMINATION OF SOME COMMONLY USED ANTIBIOTIC RESIDUES IN HOSPITAL EFFLUENTS OF KASHMIR VALLEY | UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

Large quantities of antibiotics are being used in hospitals for the treatment of human diseases and they are the primary sites of administering antibiotics into the environment. The study aimed to survey a total of five commonly used antibiotics based on SPE- LC-MS-MS technology for the out coming effluent at four hospitals of Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir, India. Samples were taken from the main sewers of the hospital where the effluent meets the natural environment. A total of 12 samples (3 from each hospital) and were mixed together to form only 4 composite samples for identifying the presence of antibiotic residues and the samples were named as SKIMS, SMHS, LD AND JLNM. Due to continuous release of the antibiotics from hospitals into the environment, the main aim of the study was to determine the presence of antibiotics in the hospital effluent by using solid-phase extraction (SPE) and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) technique. The results indicated that 95% of the samples contained residues of at least one of the investigated antibiotics. The results showed that amikacin was found in all the four samples, whereas, levofloxacin, ceftriaxone and azithromycin were observed in three, two and two samples, respectively. Pollution of water bodies by antibiotic utilization in hospitals has deleterious consequences on human health and environment.

Please see the link :-  https://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/1703

DIVERSITY OF CHLOROPHYCEAE IN THE MIRIK LAKE OF THE DARJEELING HIMALAYAN REGION | UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY


“Mirik Lake” is an artificial reservoir of Mirik town of the Darjeeling Himalayan region of West Bengal, India at an altitude of 1767 meters above mean sea level. This Lake was constructed in 1979 primarily for the facilitation of commercial tourism in Darjeeling and is fed by both perennial streams and rain water. The Lake is not only used for different recreational activities but also supplies drinking water to the local people of the Mirik Town. The Chlorophyceae constitute a large and diverse group of fresh water algae including members that are important ecologically and scientifically. Chlorophyceae are the photosynthetic organisms and one of the pioneer species in aquatic food web.

Please read full article – http://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/1527

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