WATER QUALITY STATUS OF AN URBAN LAKE, DAL IN KASHMIR HIMALAYA, INDIA |  UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

Accurate and timely information characterising aquatic ecosystems and their changes through time is becoming increasingly crucial, particularly in metropolitan settings. The current study looked at the water quality of an urban lake in Kashmir Valley called Dal. The criteria of water quality were assessed using the American Public Health Administration’s standard approach. Surface water quality research found that the lake is extensively polluted with organic and inorganic pollutants of human origin. The water quality data pertaining to various physio-chemical and biological parameters of Dal Lake were compared to World Health Organization (WHO) drinking standards, and it was discovered that several parameters such as pH, alkalinity, and coliform had exceeded the desired limits. The lake’s water quality index (WQI) ranged from 185.8 in winter to a maximum of 17217.7 in summer, indicating that the lake’s waters are unfit for consumption. Overall, anthropogenic activities such as dumping raw faecal matter from houseboats, untreated sewage from settlements, and fertiliser runoff from watershed areas have been identified as the primary causes of nutrient enrichment and water quality degradation in this significant urban lake. As a result, a continual programme of water quality monitoring over the lake surface is required to ensure the health of this essential aquatic environment.

Please see the link :- http://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/2484

EVALUATION OF PHYSICO-CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF KOTEPALLY LAKE WATER IN VIKARABAD DISTRICT OF TELANGANA STATE |  UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

Natural ecosystems and human progress both rely on water resources. It’s necessary for agriculture, industry, and human survival. The goal of this research was to look at the physicochemical properties of the Kotepally Lake in Vikarabad. Surface water samples were collected every month in polythene cans from the three sampling locations for two years, from June 2016 to May 2018. Water analysis was performed to determine physicochemical parameters such as temperature, pH, carbonates, bicarbonates, chlorides, dissolved oxygen, total hardness, sulphates, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, nitrates, total dissolved solids, total suspended solids, Biological Oxygen Demand, and Chemical Oxygen Demand. The levels of physicochemical parameters were within WHO and BIS permitted limits. The findings show that the Kotepallylake is pollutant-free and suitable for home usage, irrigation, and fish culture.

Please see the link :- http://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/2554

WATER QUALITY AND ICHTHYOFAUNAL DIVERSITY ASSESSMENT OF KAPLA Beel, A FLOODPLAIN WETLAND OF BARPETA DISTRICT OF ASSAM, NORTH-EAST INDIA | UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY


The current study was conducted for a year, from June 2017 to May 2018, to evaluate the water quality state and ichthyofaunal richness of Kapla beel, a well-known freshwater floodplain wetland in Assam’s Barpeta region. During the experiment, various parameters such as water temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen (DO), biological oxygen demand (BOD), total alkalinity, total hardness, free CO2, total solid (TS), total dissolved solid (TDS), total suspended solid (TSS), turbidity, and nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) concentrations were measured using the American Public Health Association’s standard protocol (2005). Following suitable taxonomic literature, fish species were collected and identified. Except for TS, TDS, TSS, and N, the most of the water parameters were found to be within acceptable ranges for the ichthyofauna. In terms of some water parameters, the negative effects of numerous anthropogenic activities were observed. During the study period, a total of 65 commercially important fish species were recorded and identified. The wetland as a whole has a lot of ichthyofaunal diversity and good water quality.

Please see the link :- http://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/1770

WATER QUALITY STATUS OF AN URBAN LAKE, DAL IN KASHMIR HIMALAYA, INDIA | UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

Accurate and timely information about aquatic ecosystems and their changes through time is becoming increasingly crucial, particularly in metropolitan settings. The current study looked at the water quality of Dal, a city lake in Kashmir Valley. The indicators of water quality were measured using the American Public Health Administration’s standard approach. The lake is extensively polluted with organic and inorganic wastes of human origin, according to physico-chemical and biological analyses of surface water quality. The water quality data from Dal Lake was compared to the World Health Organization’s (WHO) drinking water regulations, and it was discovered that several metrics like pH, alkalinity, and coliform had exceeded the acceptable limits. The water quality index (WQI) of the lake ranged from 185.8 in the winter to 17217.7 in the summer, indicating that the lake’s waters are unfit for consumption. Anthropogenic activities such as dumping raw faeces from houseboats, untreated sewage from settlements, and fertiliser runoff from catchment areas have all been identified as major contributors to nutrient enrichment and water quality degradation in this significant urban lake. As a result, to protect the health of this significant aquatic ecosystem, a constant programme of water quality monitoring over the lake surface is required to maintain the lake’s health.


Please see the link :- http://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/2484

WATER QUALITY ANALYSIS OF ANASAGAR LAKE, AJMER, RAJASTHAN | Asian Journal of Advances in Medical Science

On the basis of weekly sampling, the water quality of Anasagar Lake was examined for four months. This study is the first to offer data on lake water quality. Temperature (24.50°C to 33.90°C), pH (7.9 to 8.2), electrical conductivity (2.07 to 2.49 mS/cm), dissolved oxygen (7.53 to 8.73 mgL-1), alkalinity (101 to 109 mgL-1), Hardness (121 to 150 mgL-1), total dissolved solid (1344.00 to 1617.00 mgL-1), nitrate (0.88 mgL-1 to 1.02 mgL-1), phosphate (0. Anthropogenic stressors such as sewage disposal, municipal wastewater, detergent input from washing clothes and bathing, pesticide and chemical fertiliser input from unsustainable agriculture, aquaculture, and horticulture, and urban settlement have caused the lake to become severely polluted and hypertrophic.

Please see the link :- http://mbimph.com/index.php/AJOAIR/article/view/2476

DETERMINATION OF WATER STANDARDS OF UPPER LAKE, BHOPAL, INDIA | UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY

The present investigation was carried out to determine the water quality of Upper Lake in Bhopal. Upper Lake is extremely important for fisheries, drinking water, tourism and recreation, trapping, wildlife habitat, science, and education. The water samples were taken from the Upper Lake’s surface between March 2019 and February 2020, covering the summer, monsoon, and winter seasons. Standard methods were used to determine the degree of degradation in water quality using physico-chemical parameters such as dissolved oxygen (DO2), total alkalinity, total hardness, calcium hardness, magnesium hardness, turbidity, pH, and temperature. The findings revealed that there is little variance in physico-chemical parameters across three seasons in the upper lake, with the majority of water parameters being in favourable conditions for fish growth and health but not suitable for human consumption.

Please see the link :- https://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/2056

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